Casa de Paz (House of Peace)

From KarmaTube, a project of ServiceSpace

A film by Michelle Moore.

36th Avenue in the Fruitvale district of East Oakland, California, is the turf of three major gangs. Yet the residents of Casa de Paz never lock their doors. Anchored by Pancho Ramos Stierle and Adelaja Simon, Casa de Paz is part of a group of several homes that form an intentional community of peace and nonviolence in an area rife with structural and physical violence. In order to serve their community, they live with the people – laugh with them, cry with them, and eat with them. They embody “giftivism” – practicing radical acts of generosity that changes the world, one heart, one home, one block at a time.

A Good Story Gets Better

homelessThe story of Glen James, a homeless man in Boston who found a backpack containing $42,000 in cash and travelers checks and then turned it into authorities, is developing into an even better tale.

An online fundraiser to collect money for James had raised nearly $64,000 as of 9:20 a.m. ET Wednesday.

The “Boston Homeless Man Reward” campaign was launched by Ethan Whittington of Midlothian, Va., who hasn’t met James, but felt compelled to see if other Good Samaritans would “help this man change his life.”

Complete story at npr

A Bet on the Environment

bet
Just after his sophomore year at Yale in 2002, Billy Parish stood before a rapidly retreating glacier in India that feeds the Ganges River, convinced that he had come face to face with climate change and that he had to do something about it.

It did not take long. Back in the United States, he started a youth coalition that, within a few years, had mobilized thousands of people with similar environmental concerns. He never made it to his junior year at Yale.

In the years since, Mr. Parish has come to another conclusion: that capitalism is a powerful force that can be harnessed to combat global warming. Now 31, he is well into making that his next mission, building an online solar energy investment platform that could turn ordinary Americans into mini-financiers.

Complete story at

The New York Times

The New York Times